It’s Electric – A Move To Electric Mobility

The best is yet to come, and won’t that be fine?

You think you’ve seen the sun, but you ain’t seen it shine.

– Frank Sinatra

We begin the 2nd season of The Socially Inspired Investor by taking a deeper dive into the topic of Electric Mobility a.k.a. “The EV” movement. GM has announced that they will offer over 30 electrics by 2025 while publicly and loudly charting a path to an all-electric future. Clearly, Tesla has a huge lead but waking a giant rarely comes without consequence. Even Jaguar announced it will go 100% electric by 2025. Mercedes-Benz will shift its focus entirely to electric vehicles in 2025 and be prepared to sell nothing but electric cars by 2030.

As giddy as investors have been about EV, we are far from clear about how it will all develop. Experts tell us that gas combustible driven cars will still be the norm for the foreseeable future. Jeremy McCool, Founder and CEO of HEVO Power, is our featured guest on our PODCAST discussing the latest on the industry including their development of wireless EV charging.

But it’s not all roses. In our SPOTLIGHT ON section, we ask our experts to speak to the challenges and investments opportunities we face as we move toward mobility. Their observations were very insightful.

Despite the excitement, it appears the EV market currently faces epic supply chain disruptions – most notably a semiconductor chip shortage and the challenges of long charging times – especially during extended trips.  And then there is the scarcity of many of the raw materials found in the batteries that these vehicles use.

In California 20% of purchasers of EV vehicles actually revert to gas, according to a study by researchers at the University of California Davis (www.thehill.com).

Even tires will require innovation. The average EV vehicle can weigh almost twice as much as its older siblings (www.thehill.com). Companies like MICHELIN® see this as a unique opportunity to build market share and we investors should take note. On April 1, the MICHELIN® pilot® product line was launched, taking into account the higher weight characteristics associated with electric sports cars.

Yes, we are in the very early stages.

But yet we are very inspired about all the prospects that electric mobility can bring. Along the journey, we expect to find many good investment opportunities. With so much to be settled, the final story may be a long time coming.  But in the investment world, this is not necessarily a bad thing. The market adage “buy the rumor, sell the news” should inform the investor when it comes to how to “play” the EV category.

Welcome back! We have a great new season planned. If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe at www.sociallyinspiredinvestor.com to receive notices of new issues and feel free to invite others.

What are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERKarl Brauer, Executive Vice President at CarExpert.com

ANSWERThe move toward EV mobility is inevitable, but the rate and timeframe of this shift will be difficult to predict. Multiple variables, including government incentives, fuel prices, infrastructure build out, battery costs, and the health of the economy, will all play critical roles. So while it’s clear we’ve moved from an “if” to a “when” scenario, the “when” will likely take 10-15 years. Keeping investment in EVs proportional to this shift over the next decade will be the challenge across the industry.

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERTonderai Leonel Njowera, Senior Partner, ImpactVest Global Advisory

ANSWERNew energy sources coupled with innovations in cloud computing technologies are changing the entire transport industry. Challenges are associated with the availability, sustainable extraction and distribution of mineral and other resources associated with electric vehicles and necessary associated infrastructure. However, as performance and safety improves and battery costs fall, sales of electric vehicles are growing with numbers increasing from approximately 3 million electric vehicles to over 1 billion by 2050, when 75% of passenger car activity (passenger-kilometres), would be provided by electric vehicles under the Remap Case.

ANSWERThis makes investments along the entire electric vehicles value chain bankable in the run up to a carbon neutral economy by 2050, for both current auto companies, energy companies and startups too.

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERLiubov Volkowva, PhD, MBA, MS; Energy Markets and Sustainability at CIMA Energy, Mitsubishi Corp.

ANSWERThe EV market has grown at about 60% per year globally, topping 2.1 million in 2019. While the COVID-19 pandemic caused a temporary decrease in the use of vehicles and disrupted the automobile industry, it has boosted consumer interest in all-electric and hybrid electric vehicles (McKinsey Center for Future Mobility, March 2021). The key challenges and opportunities associated with the rapidly growing electric mobility market are changing consumer attitudes, drastically varying by region, EV charging infrastructure, regulatory changes, and battery technology and manufacturing, which primarily drive EV prices. In addition, the micromobility subsector, including electric bikes, scooters, and skateboards, with the $5.7 billion already invested since 2015, will continue expanding and present new opportunities for investors.

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERLiana LE, Junior Market Analyst at Kayrros

ANSWERI believe we are in the midst of a pivotal point in history for electric mobility, especially as we recover from a pandemic that left many of us rethinking our individual impact while we were locked up. The EV market is hitting full speed with growing consumer demand for electric vehicles that are equipped with innovative technology and automation. Investment opportunities will arise as more companies shift their portfolios and investments to focus on green tech and disruptive technologies. Tax incentives and subsidies will still make or break the challenge of EV infrastructure and operating costs. There are also concerns on supply meeting demand as we are seeing increasing costs of raw materials that are needed for batteries. In the end, with enough investments to further develop R&D in existing companies and as new startups arise to make electric transportation more feasible, we will inevitably reach the goals of shifting into an electric mobile world. 

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERJuliana Ennes, Communications and Strategy Development Consultant specialized in Renewable Energy

ANSWERWidespread adoption of electric vehicles in the United States faces challenges that go beyond what tax incentives can do. The public needs information.

ANSWERPeople and goods moving around the US by cars, trucks, trains, ships, airplanes and other vehicles account for 29% of the country’s GHG emissions. Over half of the transport-related emissions come from passenger vehicles and trucks with internal combustion engines.

ANSWERBoth public and private sectors aim at tackling this issue with electric vehicles. The Biden administration’s American Jobs Plan includes $174 billion towards encouraging Americans to switch to electric cars and trucks. In parallel, major car automakers have announced goals to phase out internal combustion engines. However, today EVs account for only 1.8% of new light-duty vehicles sold in the US.

ANSWERThere is a perception that costs are too high, even though studies show that albeit upfront costs are actually higher, in a lifetime of the vehicle this is offset by lower costs with maintenance and fuel.

ANSWERIt is true that batteries need more research and that the energy mix of the country and state where the car is being charged can elevate the carbon footprint of EVs. But studies show that even with coal and gas-power generation in the mix, EVs still can have a carbon footprint up to 40% lower than internal combustion engines.

ANSWERElectric vehicles are not a panacea and transport plans should still prioritize public transportation and bike infrastructure, but the switch is more than welcome and the technology is already there. 

A Year Like No Other – Our thoughts

For the strength of the Pack is the Wolf,

And the strength of the Wolf is the Pack.

Rudyard Kipling – Jungle Book

A year like no other, indeed

When we first published the SII Digest and Podcast we could not have known the pivotal year we were about to experience.  It turns out we had plenty to talk about. The amalgamation of environmental, social, and corporate governance events has been truly epic. We could not be prouder of how our team took on the challenge.

Covid-19 continues as a backdrop of course. Many of the companies that are helping us to endure through both the pandemic and the fight against climate change seem to score higher on the ESG scale – and now, with more confidence, we see the values of their stocks reflecting this potential. There seems to be little doubt within the professional investment world that sustainability and social responsibility must be taken into consideration.

This edition focuses on the whole of this past year. What have we learned?   How far have we come?   What do we see ahead? In our SPOTLIGHT ON section, we asked experts from the industry to weigh-in on these questions.

The SII PODCAST hosted by Pat O’Neill, is a retrospective of the previous podcasts our first season – all 9 of them. This episode, our 10th, recalls some of the most interesting contributions from our amazing guests, a real treasure of information. Many thanks to Sureita Hockley, who expertly produces these podcasts and Paul Ellis who takes on the responsibility of sourcing our experts. The PODCAST team comes together in a roundtable style for a very informative session.

Originally, we thought it would be helpful to amplify all the smarts around environmentally and socially conscious investing. Our mission continues to make socially responsible investing more user friendly and actionable. We will continue down that path as we move into our next season.

We see the world coming together over this time with more of a shared purpose and clarity around ESG. The “pack” is getting stronger and that should be inspiring to us all.

A Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERCarolyn Eagle, Senior Product Manager, Sustainable Investment at FTSE Russell

ANSWERWhen the United States reentered the Paris Agreement, it signaled its commitment to the global decarbonization of the economy – net zero – by the middle of this century. But large institutional investors, most of whom are broadly invested across the entire economy, are left to determine how their portfolios can reach net zero by 2050. We’ve found that many large investors cannot simply divest from oil and gas companies – and some may not be willing to. Instead, their challenge becomes determining which companies – across all sectors – are most prepared for the transition to a decarbonized world.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERGwen Le Berre, Director of Responsible Investing at Parametric Portfolio Associates

ANSWERWhile some feared that ESG was going to be sidelined by the pandemic, we experienced the exact opposite with investors better appreciating the impact that systematic ESG risks can have on the entire market. With a renewed 2020 focus on diversity, inequality, and climate change, we are continuing to see investor interest go beyond equities and into the fixed income and liquid alternatives space.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERAlexeyErmakov – Impact driven entrepreneur, Co-Founder of Impala Hub

ANSWERWhat have we learned? Clearly, it may take a bit of time for a widely accepted and globally recognized impact measurement framework to be developed, evidence and verification of impact serve well when assessing impact opportunities.

ANSWERHow far have we come? Both conventional and unconventional financial players are more committed than ever to provide “responsible” capital and are on active search for new emerging opportunities with impact-driven activity/business. Yet exposure of micro, small and medium impact-driven enterprises remains limited and fragmented.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERNimet Vural – Business Student, Bogazici University; Istanbul, Turkey

ANSWERAs far as I know, the impact of Covid-19 in 2020 jeopardizes the progress of the 2030 agenda for UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Before the current crisis, Less Developed Countries (LDCs) were struggling to achieve the SDGs. The Socio-Economic impacts of the Covid-19 require an ever more forward-looking perspective to build a better and greener future.

ANSWERMeeting the UNSDGs financing objectives will require a coordinated, many-sided, response and the use of innovative tools and risk mitigation instruments. Blended finance can help to catalyze much needed additional resources for SDG-aligned projects that private investors would otherwise overlook. Blended Finance can leverage digital technologies, finance the ‘missing middle’ gap, and address market failures that prevent LDCs from financing their development needs and reaching the most vulnerable populations.

ANSWERThe latest data shows that too little private finance is mobilised for investment in LDCs. A decline due to the global economic recession and less public revenues risks endangering gains and beneficial trends that have been made in the past few years.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERSarmad Kashan ali- Pharm.d (Doctor of pharmacy) MBA

ANSWERI believe that the impact of covid.19 on the global economy, as well as environmental and sustainability related issues, are viewed in a similar perspective by the decision makers and provide insight and opportunities in this year like no other. In ESG Investing we have to focus more on green bonds, which provide the opportunity to invest in a lower risk instrument with a constructive purpose of creating good in the society. Companies, governments, and municipalities can develop a competitive edge and raise much-needed capital. Key investments should be in renewable energy, green buildings (energy-efficient buildings), water investments, agriculture investments, (Biofuel), and technology projects such as the use of broadband and its potential to reduce emissions.

ANSWERAll stakeholders should understand and folloow the EU taxonomy governed by universal rules and regulations for all countries. Violation of these regulations should require heavy fines to be paid to global environmental funds. Together we can conserve the resources for our future generations in order to make Earth a better place to live.

Based on the significant legislation recently passed by Congress that focuses on climate action. “What’s in the bill?”, “What does it allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERBolor-Erdene Tumurchudur – Ubik Group Director of Partnerships

ANSWERAs an investor, it is important to understand energy and infrastructure-related investments are long-term investments. Thus, the bill could be higher in the short-term, but over time it will pay back. It will allow the investors to contribute to the decarbonization effort directly, and the health of the population indirectly. This also helps investors to choose research and development of renewable energy, battery storage, water management efficiency (all types of energy (including nuclear energy) and are water inseparable) and related long-term projects.

ANSWERWe also need to collaborate with city mayors, lawmakers, and other organizations to create a clear systematic structure to decrease HFC and GHG emissions. Moreover, investors need to pay attention to left off industries like nuclear Energy and their safety, specifically nuclear waste, etc. On top of that, it’s significant to push energy efficiency-focused policies and projects.

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERNimet Vural, Freelance Sustainability, Accountability and Corporate Governance

ANSWERThe Bill is aggressively fighting both the Pandemic and Climate Change. The Investment Industry seeks returns as its primary objective and today some of the most convincing opportunities for growth and returns come from a transition to a more sustainable economic model that both harnesses and preserves nature. We need to see Innovation and creativity among the Investors looking to address Social Inequalities on a more Systemic basis.

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERPaul Ellis, Founder of Paul Ellis Consulting & The Sustainable Finance Podcast

ANSWERCombining the economic cost of physical climate risks from floods, fires and storms, with the economic impact of transition climate risk like the COVID-19 pandemic, has brought the U.S. Congress together in a rare bipartisan moment related to energy policy. I expect to see more of the same as both physical and transition climate risks continue to multiply in the next two decades. And investors will play an increasingly important role in this process by voting with their retirement assets, investing in companies that produce and use clean and renewable energy products and services.

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERLebo Mahlare, Renewable Energy Finance

ANSWERThis is a significant development in the fight against climate change but we still have much more to do given that models still require less than a 2 deg C rise in global temperatures, especially in specific regions of the world.

Legislation bill passed by Congress – What is the Bill? What does it allow us to do? What still needs to be done?

…When day comes, we step out of the shade,
aflame and unafraid,
the new dawn blooms as we free it.
For there is always light,
if only we’re brave enough to see it.
If only we’re brave enough to be it.

– Amanda Gorman, National Youth Poet Laureate
Excerpt from “The Hill We Climb” (read at the 2021 Biden inauguration)

In this issue #9 of the Socially Inspired Investor Digest and companion Podcast, we look at how – in an unlikely bi-partisan way – Congress steps up to make an unequivocal stance supporting the fight against climate change, and significantly puts up billions to also make it a meaningful action for jobs and economic recovery. Funding for renewable energy and credits to consumers could make this legislation a critical turning point.

But wait, there could be more!  In addition to re-joining the Paris Accord, President Biden is proposing more clean energy enhancements in his $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal.  We shall see what the final bill will include but we believe many of the provisions around environmental sustainability haves a decent chance of surviving.

In our SPOTLIGHT ON section, we asked our team of industry experts to weigh in on the key take-aways from the legislation – How it helps and what is still needed.  The tie-in to job creation seems to be a critical component in building support.

But here is the point for investors.  Criteria historically used to evaluate investment options are changing. Desmond Wheatley who is featured in this month’s Podcast points out that an additional factor to consider is companies meet the “inevitability” of change.  That sounds right as we seem to be in the golden age of companies of all types publicly announcing their commitments to achieving net zero carbon.

Many companies will need to adapt or unfortunately see their relative value diminish if they cannot keep up. Portfolios should be evaluated not only on previous results but also where in the changing landscape find these companies in 10, 20, 40 years. 

The environmental provisions in the December, $900 billion stimulus bill includes $35 billion funding for renewable technology and energy efficiency.

  • $4 billion for solar, wind, hydropower and geothermal research and development.
  • $1.7 billion to help low-income families install renewable energy sources in their homes.
  • $2.6 billion for the Energy Department’s sustainable transportation program.
  • and $500 million for research on reducing industrial emissions.

It also authorizes $2.9 billion for the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, a program that funds high-risk, high-reward research.1

Welcome to 2021.  Time to freshen up those portfolios.


1 https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-solutions/2020/12/21/congress-climate-spending/

JOBS – How is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

The best way to predict the future is to create it.

– Abraham Lincoln

Under the radar for many, and most recently obscured by the ravages of Covid-19, the landscape for future jobs may be dramatically improving for the long term. 

Green and sustainably oriented companies are not only delivering on their ESG mandate, but other tangible dividends are providing a shot in the arm for the American worker and the communities that sorely need new purpose. We can see now how the promise of a new infrastructure for a new age goes way beyond merely saving the planet.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (9/20) two of the three fastest growing occupations projected over the next 10 years are jobs that didn’t even exist not too long ago:

#1 – Wind Turbine Service Technicians; and

#3 – Solar Photovoltaic Installers

(Nurse practitioners was #2)

Jobs like these in sustainably oriented companies now represent a powerful new resource for the middle class, with both white and blue-collar standing to benefit, mostly with good pay and benefits. And just in time, as jobs are being lost in the traditional energy sector due to technology and mechanical advancements. And investors who are lining up are winning as well.

In this issue of the Socially Inspired Investor (SII) we continue to focus on how the nature of Work and Jobs is changing. In our Podcast his month our host Pat O’Neil talks with Yana Kravtsova, Executive Vice President, Communication, Public and Environmental Affairs at Enviva LP., a leader in alternative energy producing wood pellets. Enviva is an example of a company that is providing new jobs, retraining opportunities and even conversions of old coal-based power plants. 

The Spotlight on section poses the question to leaders in the ESG Investing community, “How is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world? “, and our Basic Investing section continues to build your foundation.

We wish you a happy and healthy New Year. 

How is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERChristina Shim, Managing Director, Commercial Innovation Practice, Americas at Palladium: Make it Possible

ANSWERIt is impossible to untangle this with the changes we’ve all experienced as a result of the pandemic. The nature of ‘what’ work is vs ‘how’ work is accomplished has fundamentally shifted in the past 10 months. As companies continue to evolve towards sustainability progress for trends and reasons beyond Covid, the essential mandate of their business and model is slowly forced to adapt as well. This includes the need to integrate greater diversity and inclusion in the workforce. It includes understanding and creating transparency and traceability in supply chain. At its essence, it’s about embedding sustainability – financial, social, environmental – all into the core of the company’s strategy and operations. This is no longer a nice to have – it’s a must have.  

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERRabo Garba, Senior Consultant at Ernst & Young

ANSWEREvents of 2020 accelerated trends in sustainability and technology adoption. Companies and individuals seem to have a greater focus on systemic issues that affect society and the environment. Demand is developing for individuals that understand complex supply chains and can identify innovative business models, partnerships, and technology applications to extend decarbonization efforts beyond a company’s operations. Manipulating and understanding large data sets is critical and must be combined with new insights to solve structural problems created by our current systems.

ANSWER(These remarks are solely my own. Not representative of my employer or any other affiliated institution or organization)

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERPaul Ellis, Sustainable Finance Consultant & Host of The Sustainable Finance Podcast 

ANSWERThe COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the changing nature of work in the U.S. economy as a physical and transition Climate Risk with far-reaching social and financial implications. Front-line healthcare and service workers are at significantly higher physical risk while earning less for their labor than those of us in WFH jobs with more flexible childcare and family care options. Many public/private sector companies are struggling to retain experienced staff, with some better prepared than others to meet these challenges. In 2020 the pandemic has sent a “loud and clear” message regarding the need for more and better public/private policy partnerships regarding the nature of work if we want to “Build Back Better”.      

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERDoug Willmore, Chief Executive Officer – World Tree

ANSWERAt World Tree, we have found that our mission and values have become more important than ever. We have many potential employees that search us out specifically because of what we do and how we are doing it. Finally, I think the rest of the world is moving to what World Tree has been for many years – a virtual company. While we have an office in LA, almost all of our employees work virtually around the hemisphere. Being able to live wherever they want, work wherever they want, and not having to commute is a huge attraction to current and potential employees.

JOBS – As ESG considerations become more widely adopted, what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

You may not control

all the events that

happen to you

but you can decide

not to be reduced

by them

– Maya Angelou

Essentially the debate over how far and how fast we should move toward achieving global sustainability – taking the steps needed to slow down and perhaps even reverse climate change – hinges for many and most passionately on the perception of the impact on JOBS, both current and future.

Although the discussion has been framed as a zero sum or win/lose proposition – expedient to politicians – most experts agree that this is simply a false choice. Progress on green initiatives does not necessarily need to mean a mass loss of current JOBS. We thought it would be important to explore this topic with those closer to the work in this our 7th edition of the Socially Inspired Investor. We will continue the focus on JOBS as well in the upcoming 8th edition since the topic is rich with content and purpose.

As ESG considerations become more widely adopted, what is the realistic impact on current JOBS and future JOB opportunities? Responses from our contributing experts found in the SPOTLIGHT ON section to this question seem to agree that technology and artificial intelligence as well as post-pandemic realities have already begun the transition. 

In the accompanying PODCAST hosted by Pat O’Neill, Peter Lupoff, CEO of Net Impact tells us about how companies are already working to provide a soft landing for many of their workers while redefining the future of work. No doubt you will be surprised at some of the companies in the forefront of taking on this challenge.

Please enjoy this issue and please also pass it along to others who may have an interest in socially responsible investing.

As ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

In exploring this question we reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERNimet Vural, Student at Aerospace and Machine Learning Field

ANSWEREnvironmental trends affect the world of work directly, just as the world of work affects the environment. The future of work cannot be conceived as independent of its effects on the natural world. Environmental degradation destroys work opportunities, worsens working conditions and negatively impacts the social fabric of society. So, any efforts to achieve sustainability will entail a structural economic and government policy transformation through global frameworks like the UNSDGs. Such a transformation can also result in millions of jobs through the establishment of sustainable national and regional public policy development.  

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERJuan Adorno, MBA, Strategic Partnerships at Mascoma Bank 

ANSWERThroughout my time in the Investments industry from 2011-2019, there was a notable uptick in ESG jobs across mid and large firms, especially throughout the bull markets, as ESG retail capital flows increasingly gained momentum. Any assessment of job markets in 2020 is muddled by the pandemic, but I’ll share that more broadly speaking, the question of the connection between ESG trends and impact on job markets is relative to geography, industry, and other dimensions. As I see it, ESG is a long-term evolutionary trend, slowed by cultural pressures for preservation and conservation, at the expense of innovation: the SEC’s 2020 guidance on ESG in 401(k’s) as a case in point. 

ANSWER(These remarks are solely my own. Not representative on Mascoma Bank or any other affiliated institution or organization) 

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERKhyati Thakkar, Senior FP&A Associate, Brookfield Renewable

ANSWERDue to persistent pressure from investors to integrate ESG considerations into an organization’s long-term strategy, firms are increasingly looking to expand the scope of current jobs and future opportunities. Those with passion and a skill set for sustainability will be valued and sought after. I can already see the difference on my current role where with my educational background in finance and sustainability, I have helped build my firm’s ESG policy and the Green Finance Framework in addition to my regular job of portfolio management. 

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERCH Herbert Consulting, President

ANSWERThe loss of traditional jobs requires basic changes in economic and governing systems because for the first time in history the middle class must adapt to a technological job market that leaves too many with no work. Huge population sectors will be without work and there will be no cash flow to maintain infrastructure and govern as the civilized world progresses toward Developing country conditions. Corporate and political leadership is entrenched and will not and cannot plan, manage and implement the changes needed. Developing countries mirror the future for all unless the financial sector assumes leadership, describing the problem and what can be done about it.