Renewable Energy Getting Cheaper Every Day – What is The Potential Impact For Consumers and Investors?

We reached out to leading experts in SRI and ESG to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERNimet Vural, Sustainability, Accountability and Corporate Finance

ANSWERThe domination of Fossil fuels around the World is changing dramatically, instead, Renewable Energies are getting more acceptable. In most places around the World, Renewables are cheaper than Fossil Fuels.

ANSWERWhy can this be? Why do we see that Renewable Energy Costs are declining so fast? There are multiple reasons for it.

ANSWERFirstly, the cost of Fossil Fuel and Nuclear Power depends on the fact that the prices of Fuel mostly burn and the Power Plants’ operational costs. On the other hand, the Renewable Energy System is completely different compared to Fossil Fuels. Their operational costs are not only low but at the same time, they don’t pay anything for fuel.

ANSWERWhat is more, the role of the Portfolio Standards requires Electric Utilities and other retail Electric providers to supply a specified minimum percentage of Customer demand with eligible sources of Renewable Electricity. Several studies show that Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) help the stringency, and demand elasticity influences only the magnitude of the price effect. 

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERJack Casady, Director of Marketing at YourStake

ANSWERWe’ve seen many investors want to align their portfolios with renewable energy and renewable technologies to help create meaningful impact on the planet. With the high cost reduction in these renewable energy technologies, not only do they often make better investments, but many companies are shifting their energy suppliers to these renewable sources and lowering their carbon emissions all with lower costs.

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERCarly Turner, MSc Candidate Sustainable Resources: Economics, Policy & Transitions at University College London

ANSWERRenewable energy is getting cheaper which indicates the viability of decoupling economic growth and environmental degradation in the form of increasing carbon emissions. In my opinion, leaning into natural assets such as wind and solar energy is a far more viable strategy to meet decarbonization targets than far-off technologies such as Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). The decreasing costs of these technologies are indicative of system change which is a product of shifting consumer demand, policy reform, and new business models, all of which may be interpreted as a signal that economies are modernizing. There is a tremendous opportunity for investors to further this change by investing in renewables and continuing to scale operations to bring down costs so that consumers have access to clean, reliable, and affordable energy and therefore, consider renewable energy a norm rather than an alternative.

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERRachel “Indy” Svetanoff, Impactvest Podcast Host

ANSWERElectricity is the bedrock for modern society, and renewable energy is a sign of society advancing forward with its collective consciousness. Not only does it help restore the natural world, but renewable energy is also an opportunity to shine a light on those left in the dark, namely the underserved and marginalized communities. With costs lowering, there is a historic opportunity to reduce multidimensional poverty in a way that uplifts the quality of life for all of us.  

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERShawn Cain, Finance Student at Suffolk University “23

ANSWERRenewable energy groundwork has been happening for decades but now we’re seeing more and more adoption and investing across the board. New financial tools like green insurance and green bonds are helping get impactful projects started. Since every industry is pricing in climate change and taking steps to reverse it, the renewable energy industry is coalescing faster than ever.

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERChristianne Carin, Managing Director, CEO, Stellars LLC, | ESG Impact-Investment Management | Serial Entrepreneur & Inventor

ANSWERFocused impact-investments in innovative on-site and off-grid renewable power generation solutions for communities, agriculture and onshore manufacturing is significantly cheaper than using fossil fuels to produce electricity while also reducing omissions. Proof: According to the EIA’s chart U.S. electricity flow, 2021, fossil fuel operators consumed more energy to generate electricity than the energy provided by their fossil fuel inputs due to their high conversion losses. This loss was supplemented by renewable energy and nuclear electric power, which also provided all the energy required for the generation of electricity for end users.

QUESTIONRenewable energy is getting cheaper every day – What is the potential impact for consumers and investors?

ANSWERFranz Hochstrasser, CEO and Co-Founder, Raise Green

ANSWERWith dirty fossil fuel prices spiking at the pump and in power plants, and solar and wind surpassing gas as the cheapest form of energy in most places across the world, it has never been a better time to make your money do good by investing in the clean energy future. For those who are overwhelmed by the climate crisis and tired of being told to recycle and petition their way out of it, Raise Green is the community finance platform that enables every American to join the ranks of the heroic entrepreneurs and innovators powering the transition from dirty to clean energy.

It seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERMarci Bair, CFP, Bair Financial Planning

ANSWERThe more ESG data a company has the better it can analyze that data and information that is pertinent to the success of their company. ESG data is critical for a company to know its sustainability score for the long-term health of their company. Shareholders are educating themselves on companies ESG scores and supporting those companies that are creating a better business model that supports diversity, equity and inclusion. Employees are also becoming more decerning on whether the company they work for shares their values and those companies with higher ESG scores will attract employees focused on the future and shared success of the company.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERRebecca Self, Director of Sustainable Finance at South Pole

ANSWERComprehensive reporting on sustainability factors provides important insight on the drivers of value creation and destruction in an organization. This supports long-term strategic decision making, looking beyond simply the financial results alone. Creating a better long-term business model requires a good understanding of a company’s customers, employees and other key stakeholders. This type of sustainability information, as well as environmental metrics, give a rounded view of business impact and the future drivers of financial results.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWEREvan Zall, President, Longview Strategies

When you want to build a better engine, you poke at the gears, you examine how the pieces fit together, and you also step back to look at the machine in broader context. How can it safely perform at peak performance – for the operators, the mechanics, and everyone else involved? Same thing for expansive reporting on sustainability factors. The process that companies follow to develop accurate and authentic sustainability reporting uncovers operational risks, areas of strength, and pathways to improvement that were previously left unexplored. The resulting communications can drive greater trust in the brand, increase customer loyalty, enhance employee recruiting and retention, and boost shareholder confidence.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERRabo Garba, Senior Business Development Manager – Silicon Ranch Corporation

I think the key to successful sustainability reporting is to focus on the most impactful areas within a company’s control without losing sight of overall improvement. When leaders can take an honest look at the entire organization’s role in society and where they want to go, sustainability can then be aligned and integrated throughout the organization. I believe this kind of focus leads to better execution.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERVishal Thiruvedula, Head of Product at RS Metrics

ANSWERExpansive company reporting based on a standardized framework reduces the disclosure gap and the risk of misleading investors by providing precise information needed for investment decisions. Advances in geospatial technology such as satellites and sensors are giving companies additional tools to address the environmental disclosure gaps.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERTea Ivanovic, Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer at Immigrant Food

Impact investors are no longer a niche in the financial industry, and companies are catching on to that new reality. Doing “good” doesn’t have to come at the expense of companies’ bottom line and businesses have a much larger responsibility than maximizing returns to shareholders: we are entering an era where stakeholders are the community at large, not merely investors.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERAbass Bila, Doctorate Candidate, FMVA, CSMA, Asset Management

ANSWERCompanies’ sustainability factors disclosure exercise scarcely responds to the general call for more transparency in their reporting. Yet Transparency towards sustainability reporting represents a fundamental part of the sustainability process, which can ultimately enable innovation. Hence, expansive company reporting on key factors can help them bridge sustainability and profitability for better value propositions along with disruptive and long-term business models.

QUESTIONIt seems more expansive company reporting on sustainability factors creates a better business model – WHY?

ANSWERPablo David Necoechea Porras, Ph.D., ESG and Sustainability Senior Manager, Investor Relations, Televisa

ANSWERCompanies are increasingly reporting sustainability factors because environmental, social and governance (ESG) management is linked to greater value creation. A strong, consistent but ambitious ESG proposal can help companies access new market niches and expand in existing markets. In addition, ESG management can also significantly reduce companies’ operating costs through the efficient use of resources or the introduction of circular economy strategies in their value chain. Finally, a strong ESG management can help companies recruit, select and retain labor talent and enhance employer branding; which increases company productivity by promoting a sense of purpose and an organizational culture based on organizational development.

Does investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONDoes investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

ANSWERTonderai Njowera, Senior Partner, ImpactVest Global Advisory

ANSWERYes, it makes absolute sense! It aids in social esteem building, yielding collective long-term social, environmental, and economic dividends for those less exposed to opportunity and for the entire society, the global society.

QUESTIONDoes investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

ANSWERRupini Deepa Rajagopalan, Head of ESG Office at Berenberg

ANSWERIt is really simple in my view, investing in areas that have positive change indirectly also creates positive returns. Why? Because companies that advocate for issues such as social justice or promote social values, just means intrinsically they are built upon a culture that promotes long-term stability and even inclusion. Which is why I believe in investing in our values and coin the term “Finance with a heart”.

QUESTIONDoes investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

ANSWERKlarissa Nura, Research Analyst, ImpactVest Metrics

ANSWERIn a capitalist society, the allocation is the principle tool to create an equitable world for society and the planet where race, gender, economics and climate change is carefully considered.

QUESTIONDoes investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

ANSWEROlivia E. Knight, Racial Justice Initiative Manager at As You Sow

ANSWERInvesting in social justice is an investment in the future; corporations exist in a symbiotic relationship with the communities they serve and this relationship must be just and equitable to be healthy. Investors serve as a company’s liaison to the community and can exert a direct influence on corporate policies by promoting social justice. An investment in social justice is an investment in the community, and a healthy thriving community is essential to sustainable corporate success.

QUESTIONDoes investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

ANSWER Jennifer Priest, Content Strategist at Xactly Design & Advertising Inc.

ANSWERInvesting in social justice does make a difference…certainly to the lives of the people who benefit from improved situations. But there are also ripple effects into other areas. For example, in alleviating poverty, if individuals have more economic power they have more choice, and can buy products/services that are more sustainable vs what’s cheapest. Another thing to consider are the costs of allowing negative situations to continue (often hard to quantify, I admit).

QUESTIONDoes investing in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion make a difference and why?

ANSWERHarold Overholm, CEO at Alight

ANSWERInvesting in social justice can mean many things, but being from Sweden where education is free, I believe a fundamental investment in social justice is education accessible for all. The possibilities of childrens’ futures should not be dependent on for example the financial capability of their parents. Societies benefit from having that equal opportunity for higher education where everyone can go get a PhD (like myself)

Wind Power’s role in the renewable energy transition: what are the risks and opportunities?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONWind Power’s role in the renewable energy transition: what are the risks and opportunities?

ANSWERWendy Green– Principal Specialist, Low Carbon Energy Incubation Solutions by SASOL

ANSWERGreen hydrogen is critical for the decarbonization roadmap for many hard to abate sectors such as steel and manufacturing. The green hydrogen value chain uses electricity to deconstruct water into hydrogen and oxygen. Wind power is an excellent source of renewable power for green hydrogen plants, and is a major cost of green hydrogen.

QUESTIONWind Power’s role in the renewable energy transition: what are the risks and opportunities?

ANSWERPeter Fusaro, Founder, Wall Street Green Summit

ANSWERWind power has made tremendous strides in reducing its cost and is now globally deployed to fight climate change. Offshore wind is now ramping up with projects as varied as the US East Coast and Taiwan. Norway’s Equinor is deploying $50 billion for offshore wind projects by 2024. Germany’s Siemens has made technological breakthroughs in induction wind which does not have a gearbox and reduces operating costs. We are at the dawn of the golden age of wind power to be globally distributed.

QUESTIONWind Power’s role in the renewable energy transition: what are the risks and opportunities?

ANSWERMegahan Petersen, Management consultant and board advisor for ESG/Sustainability

ANSWERWind power will be essential in renewable energy investments. There needs to be a diversified renewable energy source mix for reliable delivery and wind is an essential part of that. Its cost structure provides an affordable entry into renewables which will be critical for any company or country that has committed to net zero or low carbon transition.

QUESTIONWind Power’s role in the renewable energy transition: what are the risks and opportunities?

ANSWERPooja Khosla, Executive Vice President Client & Product Development at Entelligent

ANSWERWe are living in the world of climate urgency. Where both speed and scalability matters. With wind power we have constraints both on speed and scalability.  Speed because it may take up to 10 years from project idea to project execution. Scalability because windiest sites are often far from the cities that consume most electricity.  The most recent energy crisis in Europe is attributed to The Wind Turbine fallouts. These fallouts are classic examples of hurdles that other nations could face as they ramp up their reliance on renewable power if the balance between speed and scalability is not met.

Are you optimistic that we are making progress in ensuring that we will have clean, usable water in the future?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONAre you optimistic that we are making progress in ensuring that we will have clean, usable water in the future?

ANSWERTyler Wood, Director of ESG & Sustainability at Gravitas Carbotura

ANSWERI’m a naturally optimistic person but unfortunately we’ll be seeing mass migrations due to water quality and scarcity in our lifetimes within the United States. There are already examples we are seeing in other countries and this is just the beginning. We are making great progress with tremendous efficiencies and technologies, but not to the scale necessary. There is far too much water waste and ultimately not sustainable for our generations to come. 

QUESTIONAre you optimistic that we are making progress in ensuring that we will have clean, usable water in the future

ANSWERThomas Schumann, Thomas Schumann Capital

ANSWERI am an optimist. In answer to your question only Benjamin Franklin comes to mind: “When the well is dry, we know the worth of water.” (Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1746)

QUESTION Are you optimistic that we are making progress in ensuring that we will have clean, usable water in the future?

ANSWERMark Gero Partner GEA@27TM Oceanic Carbon Capture Protocol

ANSWERNo, I am not.  In the distant future, maybe. In the near future having clean usable water for all is unlikely, if we continue in the direction we are going today. The very rich will have it…. eventually.  The masses will fight and die for it.

What are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERKarl Brauer, Executive Vice President at CarExpert.com

ANSWERThe move toward EV mobility is inevitable, but the rate and timeframe of this shift will be difficult to predict. Multiple variables, including government incentives, fuel prices, infrastructure build out, battery costs, and the health of the economy, will all play critical roles. So while it’s clear we’ve moved from an “if” to a “when” scenario, the “when” will likely take 10-15 years. Keeping investment in EVs proportional to this shift over the next decade will be the challenge across the industry.

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERTonderai Leonel Njowera, Senior Partner, ImpactVest Global Advisory

ANSWERNew energy sources coupled with innovations in cloud computing technologies are changing the entire transport industry. Challenges are associated with the availability, sustainable extraction and distribution of mineral and other resources associated with electric vehicles and necessary associated infrastructure. However, as performance and safety improves and battery costs fall, sales of electric vehicles are growing with numbers increasing from approximately 3 million electric vehicles to over 1 billion by 2050, when 75% of passenger car activity (passenger-kilometres), would be provided by electric vehicles under the Remap Case.

ANSWERThis makes investments along the entire electric vehicles value chain bankable in the run up to a carbon neutral economy by 2050, for both current auto companies, energy companies and startups too.

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERLiubov Volkowva, PhD, MBA, MS; Energy Markets and Sustainability at CIMA Energy, Mitsubishi Corp.

ANSWERThe EV market has grown at about 60% per year globally, topping 2.1 million in 2019. While the COVID-19 pandemic caused a temporary decrease in the use of vehicles and disrupted the automobile industry, it has boosted consumer interest in all-electric and hybrid electric vehicles (McKinsey Center for Future Mobility, March 2021). The key challenges and opportunities associated with the rapidly growing electric mobility market are changing consumer attitudes, drastically varying by region, EV charging infrastructure, regulatory changes, and battery technology and manufacturing, which primarily drive EV prices. In addition, the micromobility subsector, including electric bikes, scooters, and skateboards, with the $5.7 billion already invested since 2015, will continue expanding and present new opportunities for investors.

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERLiana LE, Junior Market Analyst at Kayrros

ANSWERI believe we are in the midst of a pivotal point in history for electric mobility, especially as we recover from a pandemic that left many of us rethinking our individual impact while we were locked up. The EV market is hitting full speed with growing consumer demand for electric vehicles that are equipped with innovative technology and automation. Investment opportunities will arise as more companies shift their portfolios and investments to focus on green tech and disruptive technologies. Tax incentives and subsidies will still make or break the challenge of EV infrastructure and operating costs. There are also concerns on supply meeting demand as we are seeing increasing costs of raw materials that are needed for batteries. In the end, with enough investments to further develop R&D in existing companies and as new startups arise to make electric transportation more feasible, we will inevitably reach the goals of shifting into an electric mobile world. 

QUESTIONWhat are the challenges and investment opportunities we face as we move toward electric mobility?

ANSWERJuliana Ennes, Communications and Strategy Development Consultant specialized in Renewable Energy

ANSWERWidespread adoption of electric vehicles in the United States faces challenges that go beyond what tax incentives can do. The public needs information.

ANSWERPeople and goods moving around the US by cars, trucks, trains, ships, airplanes and other vehicles account for 29% of the country’s GHG emissions. Over half of the transport-related emissions come from passenger vehicles and trucks with internal combustion engines.

ANSWERBoth public and private sectors aim at tackling this issue with electric vehicles. The Biden administration’s American Jobs Plan includes $174 billion towards encouraging Americans to switch to electric cars and trucks. In parallel, major car automakers have announced goals to phase out internal combustion engines. However, today EVs account for only 1.8% of new light-duty vehicles sold in the US.

ANSWERThere is a perception that costs are too high, even though studies show that albeit upfront costs are actually higher, in a lifetime of the vehicle this is offset by lower costs with maintenance and fuel.

ANSWERIt is true that batteries need more research and that the energy mix of the country and state where the car is being charged can elevate the carbon footprint of EVs. But studies show that even with coal and gas-power generation in the mix, EVs still can have a carbon footprint up to 40% lower than internal combustion engines.

ANSWERElectric vehicles are not a panacea and transport plans should still prioritize public transportation and bike infrastructure, but the switch is more than welcome and the technology is already there. 

A Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERCarolyn Eagle, Senior Product Manager, Sustainable Investment at FTSE Russell

ANSWERWhen the United States reentered the Paris Agreement, it signaled its commitment to the global decarbonization of the economy – net zero – by the middle of this century. But large institutional investors, most of whom are broadly invested across the entire economy, are left to determine how their portfolios can reach net zero by 2050. We’ve found that many large investors cannot simply divest from oil and gas companies – and some may not be willing to. Instead, their challenge becomes determining which companies – across all sectors – are most prepared for the transition to a decarbonized world.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERGwen Le Berre, Director of Responsible Investing at Parametric Portfolio Associates

ANSWERWhile some feared that ESG was going to be sidelined by the pandemic, we experienced the exact opposite with investors better appreciating the impact that systematic ESG risks can have on the entire market. With a renewed 2020 focus on diversity, inequality, and climate change, we are continuing to see investor interest go beyond equities and into the fixed income and liquid alternatives space.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERAlexeyErmakov – Impact driven entrepreneur, Co-Founder of Impala Hub

ANSWERWhat have we learned? Clearly, it may take a bit of time for a widely accepted and globally recognized impact measurement framework to be developed, evidence and verification of impact serve well when assessing impact opportunities.

ANSWERHow far have we come? Both conventional and unconventional financial players are more committed than ever to provide “responsible” capital and are on active search for new emerging opportunities with impact-driven activity/business. Yet exposure of micro, small and medium impact-driven enterprises remains limited and fragmented.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERNimet Vural – Business Student, Bogazici University; Istanbul, Turkey

ANSWERAs far as I know, the impact of Covid-19 in 2020 jeopardizes the progress of the 2030 agenda for UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Before the current crisis, Less Developed Countries (LDCs) were struggling to achieve the SDGs. The Socio-Economic impacts of the Covid-19 require an ever more forward-looking perspective to build a better and greener future.

ANSWERMeeting the UNSDGs financing objectives will require a coordinated, many-sided, response and the use of innovative tools and risk mitigation instruments. Blended finance can help to catalyze much needed additional resources for SDG-aligned projects that private investors would otherwise overlook. Blended Finance can leverage digital technologies, finance the ‘missing middle’ gap, and address market failures that prevent LDCs from financing their development needs and reaching the most vulnerable populations.

ANSWERThe latest data shows that too little private finance is mobilised for investment in LDCs. A decline due to the global economic recession and less public revenues risks endangering gains and beneficial trends that have been made in the past few years.

QUESTIONA Year Like No Other – What have we learned? How far have we come? What do we see ahead?

ANSWERSarmad Kashan ali- Pharm.d (Doctor of pharmacy) MBA

ANSWERI believe that the impact of covid.19 on the global economy, as well as environmental and sustainability related issues, are viewed in a similar perspective by the decision makers and provide insight and opportunities in this year like no other. In ESG Investing we have to focus more on green bonds, which provide the opportunity to invest in a lower risk instrument with a constructive purpose of creating good in the society. Companies, governments, and municipalities can develop a competitive edge and raise much-needed capital. Key investments should be in renewable energy, green buildings (energy-efficient buildings), water investments, agriculture investments, (Biofuel), and technology projects such as the use of broadband and its potential to reduce emissions.

ANSWERAll stakeholders should understand and folloow the EU taxonomy governed by universal rules and regulations for all countries. Violation of these regulations should require heavy fines to be paid to global environmental funds. Together we can conserve the resources for our future generations in order to make Earth a better place to live.

Based on the significant legislation recently passed by Congress that focuses on climate action. “What’s in the bill?”, “What does it allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERBolor-Erdene Tumurchudur – Ubik Group Director of Partnerships

ANSWERAs an investor, it is important to understand energy and infrastructure-related investments are long-term investments. Thus, the bill could be higher in the short-term, but over time it will pay back. It will allow the investors to contribute to the decarbonization effort directly, and the health of the population indirectly. This also helps investors to choose research and development of renewable energy, battery storage, water management efficiency (all types of energy (including nuclear energy) and are water inseparable) and related long-term projects.

ANSWERWe also need to collaborate with city mayors, lawmakers, and other organizations to create a clear systematic structure to decrease HFC and GHG emissions. Moreover, investors need to pay attention to left off industries like nuclear Energy and their safety, specifically nuclear waste, etc. On top of that, it’s significant to push energy efficiency-focused policies and projects.

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERNimet Vural, Freelance Sustainability, Accountability and Corporate Governance

ANSWERThe Bill is aggressively fighting both the Pandemic and Climate Change. The Investment Industry seeks returns as its primary objective and today some of the most convincing opportunities for growth and returns come from a transition to a more sustainable economic model that both harnesses and preserves nature. We need to see Innovation and creativity among the Investors looking to address Social Inequalities on a more Systemic basis.

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERPaul Ellis, Founder of Paul Ellis Consulting & The Sustainable Finance Podcast

ANSWERCombining the economic cost of physical climate risks from floods, fires and storms, with the economic impact of transition climate risk like the COVID-19 pandemic, has brought the U.S. Congress together in a rare bipartisan moment related to energy policy. I expect to see more of the same as both physical and transition climate risks continue to multiply in the next two decades. And investors will play an increasingly important role in this process by voting with their retirement assets, investing in companies that produce and use clean and renewable energy products and services.

QUESTION”What’s in the bill?”, “What does allow us to do?” and “What still needs to be done?”

ANSWERLebo Mahlare, Renewable Energy Finance

ANSWERThis is a significant development in the fight against climate change but we still have much more to do given that models still require less than a 2 deg C rise in global temperatures, especially in specific regions of the world.

How is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

We reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERChristina Shim, Managing Director, Commercial Innovation Practice, Americas at Palladium: Make it Possible

ANSWERIt is impossible to untangle this with the changes we’ve all experienced as a result of the pandemic. The nature of ‘what’ work is vs ‘how’ work is accomplished has fundamentally shifted in the past 10 months. As companies continue to evolve towards sustainability progress for trends and reasons beyond Covid, the essential mandate of their business and model is slowly forced to adapt as well. This includes the need to integrate greater diversity and inclusion in the workforce. It includes understanding and creating transparency and traceability in supply chain. At its essence, it’s about embedding sustainability – financial, social, environmental – all into the core of the company’s strategy and operations. This is no longer a nice to have – it’s a must have.  

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERRabo Garba, Senior Consultant at Ernst & Young

ANSWEREvents of 2020 accelerated trends in sustainability and technology adoption. Companies and individuals seem to have a greater focus on systemic issues that affect society and the environment. Demand is developing for individuals that understand complex supply chains and can identify innovative business models, partnerships, and technology applications to extend decarbonization efforts beyond a company’s operations. Manipulating and understanding large data sets is critical and must be combined with new insights to solve structural problems created by our current systems.

ANSWER(These remarks are solely my own. Not representative of my employer or any other affiliated institution or organization)

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERPaul Ellis, Sustainable Finance Consultant & Host of The Sustainable Finance Podcast 

ANSWERThe COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the changing nature of work in the U.S. economy as a physical and transition Climate Risk with far-reaching social and financial implications. Front-line healthcare and service workers are at significantly higher physical risk while earning less for their labor than those of us in WFH jobs with more flexible childcare and family care options. Many public/private sector companies are struggling to retain experienced staff, with some better prepared than others to meet these challenges. In 2020 the pandemic has sent a “loud and clear” message regarding the need for more and better public/private policy partnerships regarding the nature of work if we want to “Build Back Better”.      

QUESTIONHow is the nature of work changing as companies move toward a more socially and environmentally sustainable world?

ANSWERDoug Willmore, Chief Executive Officer – World Tree

ANSWERAt World Tree, we have found that our mission and values have become more important than ever. We have many potential employees that search us out specifically because of what we do and how we are doing it. Finally, I think the rest of the world is moving to what World Tree has been for many years – a virtual company. While we have an office in LA, almost all of our employees work virtually around the hemisphere. Being able to live wherever they want, work wherever they want, and not having to commute is a huge attraction to current and potential employees.

As ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

In exploring this question we reached out to leading experts in the ESG investing industry to find out their responses, and this is what we found…

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERNimet Vural, Student at Aerospace and Machine Learning Field

ANSWEREnvironmental trends affect the world of work directly, just as the world of work affects the environment. The future of work cannot be conceived as independent of its effects on the natural world. Environmental degradation destroys work opportunities, worsens working conditions and negatively impacts the social fabric of society. So, any efforts to achieve sustainability will entail a structural economic and government policy transformation through global frameworks like the UNSDGs. Such a transformation can also result in millions of jobs through the establishment of sustainable national and regional public policy development.  

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERJuan Adorno, MBA, Strategic Partnerships at Mascoma Bank 

ANSWERThroughout my time in the Investments industry from 2011-2019, there was a notable uptick in ESG jobs across mid and large firms, especially throughout the bull markets, as ESG retail capital flows increasingly gained momentum. Any assessment of job markets in 2020 is muddled by the pandemic, but I’ll share that more broadly speaking, the question of the connection between ESG trends and impact on job markets is relative to geography, industry, and other dimensions. As I see it, ESG is a long-term evolutionary trend, slowed by cultural pressures for preservation and conservation, at the expense of innovation: the SEC’s 2020 guidance on ESG in 401(k’s) as a case in point. 

ANSWER(These remarks are solely my own. Not representative on Mascoma Bank or any other affiliated institution or organization) 

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERKhyati Thakkar, Senior FP&A Associate, Brookfield Renewable

ANSWERDue to persistent pressure from investors to integrate ESG considerations into an organization’s long-term strategy, firms are increasingly looking to expand the scope of current jobs and future opportunities. Those with passion and a skill set for sustainability will be valued and sought after. I can already see the difference on my current role where with my educational background in finance and sustainability, I have helped build my firm’s ESG policy and the Green Finance Framework in addition to my regular job of portfolio management. 

QUESTIONAs ESG considerations become more widely adopted what’s the realistic impact on current jobs and future job opportunities?

ANSWERCH Herbert Consulting, President

ANSWERThe loss of traditional jobs requires basic changes in economic and governing systems because for the first time in history the middle class must adapt to a technological job market that leaves too many with no work. Huge population sectors will be without work and there will be no cash flow to maintain infrastructure and govern as the civilized world progresses toward Developing country conditions. Corporate and political leadership is entrenched and will not and cannot plan, manage and implement the changes needed. Developing countries mirror the future for all unless the financial sector assumes leadership, describing the problem and what can be done about it.